Fountain of Knowledge: MOOCs free online courses

I have been fortunate that lockdown has enabled me to explore those things on my ‘to do list’ that I never quite get chance to do. This includes reading pedagogical books, watching educational live streams (see ResearchED ) and signing up to my first MOOCS (a free online course database).

After enjoying browsing through the vast amount of courses available, in what seems like endless subject areas from institutions all over the world, I decided to choose: Testing Times in the Classroom: Challenges of 21st Century Education, provided by the University of Exeter through Future Learn. This seemed like a good choice in the current climate, I wanted to explore the pedagogy surrounding current education but also hear the thoughts and views of teachers and educators across the world during the crisis. I am currently only in my second week but so far it has lived up to everything I had wanted.

Each course works differently but this is a four week course, which releases tasks, articles, interesting questions to consider, polls and discussion forums each week. There are a number of activities that are easy to work through, manageable, engaging and you can easily stop and start according to busy schedules. It outlines a requirement of four hours each week, however this could go up or down depending on your level of commitment to the discussions, reading and adding to the comments as you go. It also doesn’t matter if you fall a little behind as you can still access the previous week’s activities.

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ResearchED: Keeping a finger on the pedagogy pulse.

rED-logo-printI might be a little late to the party but I have recently come across the live streams on ResearchEd with some very big names within current and recent pedagogical practice including Dylan Wiliam, David Didau and Rob Coe. This document outlines the upcoming live streams and has links for streams that have already taken place. If you would like to develop your pedagogical understanding and keep your finger on the pulse regarding research and practice, I highly recommend exploring the variety of options available. Most of the live streams are half an hour with the rest of the time on Q/A.

I have summarised the main points from two live streams I have watched so far.

Tom Sherrington Rosenshine’s Principles and Curriculum Design: What’s the connection?

Sherrington talks extensively about establishing an ambitious curriculum, as for him ‘curriculum is the weakness.’ He explores how it is the ‘simultaneous teaching [of] a whole group of people at the same time’ that is the problem. This is where Rosenshine’s principles come into their own. It supports planning a curriculum where ALL students can thrive in every lesson – ‘getting into the corners’ of your classroom.

Building Schemas:

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