Revision Live Streams

I will be doing a number of last minute support Q/A and top tips livestreams. Here is the timetable of events:

8th June

6.00pm Philosophy https://youtu.be/5yyeihSJE9c

7.00pm Criminology Unit Four https://youtu.be/EDEeey9JEWs

13th June

6.00pm Ethics https://youtu.be/TZN2Wzxrhxo

20th June

6.00pm DCT https://youtu.be/UTyT1URYWfQ

Criminology Unit Four Past Questions and Gaps: Exam 2022

Since the advanced information for Criminology was finally announced, it has been a whirlwind trying to interpret the altered specification, preparing coverall revision powerpoints (check out here: Unit Two and Unit Four) and analysing past exam papers for insights and obvious gaps. Here you will find the past questions (2017-2020) that link to the topics asked on the advanced information for Unit Four, plus any gaps (areas on the specification that have never been asked) and potential questions. So here is what I have found:

Assessment Criteria: 1.1

Past Questions:​

  • Outline the process used by the government for making laws such as The Theft Act 1968. 3 marks (2017)
  • Identify four features of the parliamentary (governmental) law making process. 4 marks (2020)

Gaps and Possible Questions:​

  • Describe the governmental processes used for law making.

Assessment Criteria: 1.2

Past Questions:​

  • Describe the relationship of the prison service with other agencies in the criminal justice system. 7 marks (2017)
  • Outline the role of the prison service in England and Wales. 3 marks (2018)
  • Describe relationships between the police, CPS and the courts as a case proceeds through the criminal justice system. (Not CPS in 2022 exam) 6 marks (2018)
  • Analyse the relationship between the Probation Service and other agencies in the criminal justice system. 8 marks (2019)
  • Describe the relationships between the courts and agencies of formal punishment within the criminal justice system. 9 marks (2020)

Gaps and Possible Questions:​

  • Describe the relationship pf the police with other agencies in the criminal justice system.
  • Describe relationships between the police, courts and formal punishment as a case proceeds through the criminal justice system.
  • Describe the relationships between the police and agencies of formal punishment within the criminal justice system.
  • Outline the role of the police service in England and Wales.
  • Outline the role of the courts in England and Wales.
  • Outline the role of the probation service in England and Wales.

Assessment Criteria: 1.3

Continue reading “Criminology Unit Four Past Questions and Gaps: Exam 2022”

Criminology Revision Materials (NEW)

These packs contain the coverall powerpoints created for the 2022 Criminology exam (as seen on YouTube). You will also receive as copy of the coverall worksheet which accompanies the coverall powerpoint. Finally you will receive a worksheet which can be printed for students that covers all past questions relating to the advanced information and possible questions/ gaps (as featured in a previous blog).

Unit Two:

Unit Four:

Criminology ‘coveralls’ for 2022 Exam

The first place I started when the advanced information was released (finally) was to try and decipher what sections of the specification have remained and which have been removed.

I have created this coverall powerpoint (that I will use as the structure of my revision lessons) to emphasize the key areas to focus on.

Unit Two:

Unit Four:

If you would like a copy of the coverall powerpoint, coverall worksheet and printable table of past questions and possible gaps please click here: Unit Two and Unit Four.

Criminology Unit Two Past Questions and Gaps: Exam 2022

Since the advanced information for Criminology was finally announced, it has been a whirlwind trying to interpret the altered specification, preparing coverall revision powerpoints (check out here: Unit Two and Unit Four) and analysing past exam papers for insights and obvious gaps. I am currently focusing on Unit Two (with preparation for Unit Four simmering in the background) and since deciphering the changes made by the exam board, the next move seemed to be colour coordinating past exam questions to see what has been asked, where the gaps are (areas on the specification never been asked) and potential questions. So here is what I have found:

Assessment Criteria: 1.2

Past Questions:​

  • With reference to examples, analyse how laws change due to time, place and culture. 9 marks (2017)​
  • Discuss, using examples, how laws have changed over time. 7 marks (2019)​

Gaps and Possible Questions:​

  • Discuss, using examples, how laws change over place.​
  • Discuss, using examples, how laws change from culture to culture.
  • How laws are applied differently according to circumstance in which actions occur.

Assessment Criteria: 2.1

Past Questions:​

  • With reference to the text above, describe the main features of one physiological theory of criminality. 5 marks (2017)​
  • Describe one physiological theory of criminality. 5 marks (2018)​
  • Describe one biological theory of criminality. 5 marks (2019)​

Gaps and Possible Questions:​

  • Describe one physiological theory of criminality.​

Assessment Criteria: 2.2

Past Questions:

  • Describe one individualistic theory of criminality. 5 marks (2017)
  • With reference to Jimmy’s case, describe one individualistic theory of criminality. 5 marks (2018)
  • Describe one individualistic theory of criminality. 5 marks (2019)
  • Briefly describe one individualistic theory of criminality. 4 marks (2020)

Past Questions:

  • Describe the main features of one Learning Theory of criminality.

Assessment Criteria: 3.1

Past Questions:

  • Analyse how the theory described above (individualistic) can be applied to Paul’s situation. 5 marks (2017)

Gaps and Possible Questions:​

  • Note: Questions will depend on scenario given but you can apply Physiological and Learning Theories to it. Marks can be awarded for other relevant links even if not on the Advanced Info for 2022.

Assessment Criteria: 3.2

Continue reading “Criminology Unit Two Past Questions and Gaps: Exam 2022”

“But I have never sat an exam before!” Strategies to Help Students Excel.

I cannot express how pleased I am that exams are going ahead this year. I am able to plan, organise and structure my teaching once more around a clear end goal without flip flopping between TAG’s, assessments and the general unknown. I know this same sentiment however is not felt by students. We know what is coming, the hardship of revision that is needed and the intense pressure and stress that the exams culture puts students under. The problem is our students do not. They have not had to revise for exams or sit formalised, intensive exam periods that feel like you are sitting in a pressurised gas can ready to explode at any minute. So what can we do to help ensure our students are resilient revisers, independent workers and exam succeeders?

Identifying the problem:

A good place to start when organising revision is to ask students to write down what they think ‘resilience’ means and how a student would show this when preparing for exams.  I would also ask them what independent study looks like. Quite often students might struggle to remain resilient or complete productive independent study but this is because they don’t know what these qualities actually look like in practice. From here you can discuss their views, iron out issues and set a clear structure of expectation.

You then need to work out if a student is struggling or underperforming due to lack of revision (night before exam cramming will not work) or a lack of fruitful revision (revising for hours but nothing is working).  This will then help work out a strategy appropriate to the needs of the student.

Organising their minds:

A disorganised folder = disorganised mind and thus disorganised revision. Students need to be able to see a clear path through the topics in order to organise where to start.

So where to start: using the specification for each topic or a list of past exam questions get students to RAG rate what they know (green), sort of know (amber) and totally don’t know (red). This way they can see where their priority areas are (see Past Exam Questions: Gaps and Patterns (for 2022 exam))

Once they have identified which areas need the most work, give students a blank weekly timetable (one for every week leading up the exam) and get them to fill out when they have free evenings, weekends and study periods (this is often tricky around student’s employment schedules and can often be an ongoing activity). Have them add in important dates like the exams, class mocks, HW deadlines or tests. From here they start to fill out what topic areas they will revise on what day. This provides much needed structure to their revision.

Revision strategies:

Continue reading ““But I have never sat an exam before!” Strategies to Help Students Excel.”